Monday, 4 March 2013

Recipe: Mother's Day daisy cookie pops

Mother's Day daisy cookie pops, as made by EJ
With just a few days to go until Mother's Day, I've been baking up some treats - I think home made gifts are always a lovely gesture, particularly on Mother's Day. Spring inspired, these daisy cookie pops would be a great gift for Easter too! These floral cookie pops are very easy to make, (although the icing does require a little patience).

I used my basic sugar cookie recipe for these Mother's Day cookie pops (follow the link for the instructions). You'll also need the following tools and sugar paste to ice:
  • A small daisy plunger cutter (approx 2cm diameter)
  • A small leaf plunger cutter (approx 3.5 cm length)
  • A rolling pin
  • White sugar paste
  • Yellow sugar paste
  • Green sugar paste
  • Cornflour (for dusting)
  • Tinfoil
  • 15 wooden lolly sticks
  • An 8cm round cookie cutter
  • A 7cm round cookie cutter
  • Edible glue
  • A food safe paintbrush
The baked sugar cookies freeze very well - so don't feel like you have to make and ice 15 cookie pops if you don't need that many! Seal the remaining (un-iced) biscuits in an air tight tupperware, or wrap well in cling film to freeze until you need them (make sure you unwrap them fully to defrost to prevent moisture softening the cookies).

I use cornflour to dust my surface when rolling out the sugar paste - if you use icing sugar, it will make the sugar paste sticky and tricky to work with. A little cornflour will prevent the sugar paste from sticking to the surface and your rolling pin. The icing is very easy, but can become fragile as it dries, you may find that using a pallet knife to lift the daisies onto the cookies makes this process a little easier.

How to:
The sugar cookie recipe should make approximately 15 x 8cm round cookies - follow the instructions, rolling the dough out to be 4-5mm thick and cut out the biscuits. Arrange them on lined baking trays and carefully push a lolly stick into each one. Chill the unbaked cookies for one hour before baking (this will help them to keep their shape as they bake).

The un-baked cookie pops
Allow the cookie pops to cool on a wire rack before decorating, although it's a good idea to prepare the sugar paste decorations in advance so they have time to set.

To decorate:
Dust your clean workspace with a little cornflour, knead a lump of the white sugar paste and roll it out to be approximately 3mm thick. Use a 7cm round cutter to cut out 15 circles and use the edible glue and paintbrush to stick them to the cookie pops, lay them out to set.

Cut out 60 daisies, using the daisy plunger cutter (allowing for four flowers per cookie pop). To encourage the daisies to dry with their petals curved upwards, make little foil cups for each flower to sit in while the sugar paste dries.

Sugar paste daisies in foil cups
While the daisies are sitting in their foil cups, roll out a tiny ball of pollen for each daisy from the yellow sugar paste (you can do this by hand).

Sugar paste daisies & pollen
To assemble the daisies, dot a little edible glue in the centre of each and carefully place a little pollen ball on top of the glue - leave to set while you prepare the leaves.

Sugar paste daisies & pollen
Dust your workspace with a little cornflour and roll out the green sugar paste to be approximately 3mm thick. Use the leaf plunger cutter to cut out 30 leaf shapes, pressing the plunger down to emboss the veins onto the sugar paste.

Sugar paste daisies & leaves


Use the edible glue to stick the leaves and daisies onto each cookie pop and leave to dry. The sugar paste shapes can be quite fragile and difficult to handle (especially the daisies) - you may find it useful to use a pallet knife to lift these off the board.


Mother's day sugar cookie pops
Leave the icing to set before packaging the sugar cookie pops - these look lovely individually wrapped in a cellophane bag with ribbon tied in a bow at the base of the cookie.

Lucky Mum! To Mothers, daughters and grandmothers everywhere - have a very happy Mother's Day.

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